Upper East Side

The area was defined by the attractions of the bluff overlooking the East River, which ran without interruption from James William Beekman's "Mount Pleasant", north of the marshy squalor of Turtle Bay, to Gracie Mansion.

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Midtown West

It is home to some of the city’s most iconic buildings, including the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, and the United Nations Headquarters.

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West Chelsea/Far West Side

The conversion of the High Line to an elevated urban park has stimulated much real estate development in West Chelsea, such as these two luxury apartment buildings, “Highline 519” and “HL23” on 23rd Street

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Tribeca

The area was among the first residential neighborhoods developed in New York beyond the boundaries of the city during colonial times, with residential development beginning in the late 18th century. 

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NoHo/ Central Village

The district also contains early-nineteenth century houses, nineteenth- and twentieth-century institutional buildings, turn-of-the-century office buildings, as well as modest twentieth-century commercial structures.

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Hell’s Kitchen

From being the home base of the Westies, dangerous gang from the industrial neighborhood days. Today Hell's Kitchen is an increasingly upscale neighborhood of affluent people, as well as residents from the 'old days'.

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Chelsea

The neighborhood is primarily residential, with a mix of tenements, apartment blocks, city housing projects, townhouses and renovated rowhouses, as well as the many new latest style development now.  Chelsea’s retail businesses reflect the diversity of the population.

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SoHo

SoHo is the neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, notable for being the location of many artists' lofts and art galleries, to movie stars and for the wide variety of stores and shops ranging from trendy boutiques to outlets of upscale national and international chain stores.

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Union Square

The park owes its name to its location at the intersection—or union—of two major roads in New York City, Bloomingdale Road (now Broadway) and Bowery Road (now Fourth Avenue).

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Inwood, Hudson and Washington Heights Cafes & Bakeries

Washington Heights is connected to New Jersey via the George Washington Bridge and the neighborhood is served by the C and the A subways, with Port Authority only 5 stops away via express.

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East Harlem

You can find vast stretches of greenery, ponds and lakes perfect for escaping the crowds on foot or by bike, there are plenty of ways to join in the fun in this enormous slice of wilderness Central Park and 843 acres, to be exact.

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Upper West Side Columbus Circle

The name is also used for the neighborhood a few blocks around the circle in each direction. To the south of the circle in each direction.

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Little Italy Nolita

Walking beside the narrow, cobblestone streets beneath the fire escape of turn-of-the-last-century tenements, it is fun to be enveloped by the sights, sounds and smells of Italian cuisine and culture emanating from the restaurants, bakery shops and stores.

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Greenwich Village

The neighborhood is bordered by Broadway to the east, the Hudson River to the west, Hudson Street to the south, and 14th Street to the north, and roughly centered around Washington Square and New York University.

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The East Village

The area maintained a district character before and after its secession from the Lower East Side. Today new condo projects have risen alongside the neighborhood’s token tenements as developers buy up property.

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Harlem

Harlem is a large neighborhood within the northern section of New York City borough of Manhattan. Harlem has been made famous as a major African-American residential, cultural and business hub.

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